TRS: Semicircles and Quadrants

Semi circles: If a storm is divided along the route, at which the storm is passing, then we get 2 parts, which are,
  1. Right-hand semicircle (RHSC): It is the half of the storm, which lies to the right of the observer, who faces along the route of the storm. For a stationary observer, here the wind veers steadily.
  2. Left-hand semicircle (LHSC): It is the half of the storm, which lies to the left of the observer, who faces along the route of the storm. For a stationary observer, here the wind backs steadily.
In the northern hemisphere (NH), conditions on the right-hand side of storms are more severe than those on their left-hand sides. For that reason, in NH, RHSC is called the “dangerous semicircle” and LHSC is called the “navigable semicircle”.

 
Semi circles are two types, which are,
  1. Navigable semicircle — It is the side of a tropical cyclone, which lies to the left of the direction of movement of the storm in the Northern Hemisphere (to the right in the Southern Hemisphere), where the winds are weaker and better for the navigation purpose, although all parts of TRS are more or less dangerous to mariners.
  2. Dangerous semicircle— It is the side of a tropical cyclone, which lies to the right of the direction of movement of the storm in the Northern Hemisphere (to the left in the Southern Hemisphere), where the storm has the strongest winds and heavy seas.

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